Posted on

Hat’s The Word !

Bridport Hat Festival 2019 is fast approaching, and with that comes the inevitable pressure to create an astounding garb for your head. Well fear not, as out selection of ribbons, trims, feather and more is sure to offer something to anyone looking to spruce up their headwear.

This piece was brought in on Saturday by a customer, and they used our rainbow feathers (£6.45 /m – 60cm used) and rainbow cord (40p /m) to add some colour and life to this vintage top hat!

We have a huge range of different fabrics and accessories you can add to any headpiece to help prepare you for a Saturday of crazy hat-ness.

Posted on

Easter Opening Hours

Our regular opening hours are Monday to Friday from 9am – 5pm but over the Easter period they are slightly different.  We will be putting a sign on the front doors of both shops as well.

Monday – Thursday      9am – 5pm

Good Friday                   Closed

Easter Saturday             9am – 5pm

Easter Sunday                Closed

Easter Monday               Closed

Tuesday 23rd April        Normal Opening Times resume

Posted on

No Business like ‘Sew’ Business

 

 

Bridport Arts Centre is all ready to kick off its Fashion Week event to celebrate fashion history, costume and the recent upsurge in the popularity of sewing.  Starting on Monday 4th March and running through to Sunday 10th March there is sure to be something to whet your appetite and inspire you to get your sewing machine out.  Livingstone Textiles is very proud to have been able to sponsor this event and during the week we will have a stand in the Arts Centre foyer where you can pick up information about our locations and the products and services we provide as well as a huge selection of fabric and haberdashery to choose from.

.

The events consist of talks on pattern drafting, pattern reading, historical fashion and the influences of modern London fashion through the experienced eye of Saville Row tailor, author and tv presenter James Sherwood. Also visiting Bridport to talk about the Royal Wardrobe are the Curators of Bath Museum of Fashion. They will be explaining their current exhibition on modern royal fashion as well as the royal wardrobe of Queen Alexander, Princess Margaret, Queen Elizabeth the Queen Mother and our current Queen Elizabeth. Continuing the fashion history theme, Bridport museum will be giving a unique insight into their textile and costume collection dating back 150 years and Arts Centre Director Curtis Fulcher will be giving an informed talk on Tudors and Historical costume. Curtis is an experienced costume designer and maker and has made a couple of recreations to demonstrate his talk with questions. There are also a great range of films to watch about some of the greatest fashion designers that have ever lived and you can find more information about the whole weeks events here

Posted on

What happens on Burns Night?

 

 

Burns Night is annualy celebrated in Scotland on the 25th of January and celebrates the works of the great poet Robert Burns.  It is also now frequently observed in other parts of the United Kingdom by native Scots and those who appreciate the heritage of Scotland.   Robert Burns was born on January 25th 1759 which is why Burns night is celebrated on this day.  He died in 1796 and his best known work is probably “Auld Lang Syne” which is traditionally sung at midnight on New Years Eve or Hogmanny. He is known in Scotland as “The Bard”

Many families and friends enjoy getting together on Burns Night to share a supper of Haggis, Neeps and Tatties with Whisky as the preferred tipple.  You can find out more about Haggis here.  During the evening poetry written by Robert Burns is recited, sometimes Scottish songs are sung and then the Haggis is traditionally ‘piped in’ by a Bagpipe player in full Scottish dress where it is toasted on arrival at the table.  At Burns night events many men choose to wear kilts and women might wear a shawl, skirt, sash or dress made from their family tartan.  A tartan is a cloth made of wool woven in a distinctive check pattern using different colours across the warp and the weft and clans have their own distinct patterns that have been replicated over centuries, often nowadays in more modern blends of viscose and polyester as well as in wool.

If you are attending a Burns Night event you can choose from the range of bright new tartans at Livingstone Textiles to create a sash or shawl over your evening attire, we don’t have much online but their are lots to choose from in house.  We also stock some colourful tartan ribbons to dress your hair or add interest to a plain dress, pop in to either of our shops to browse our collections.  We also think that it’s a great idea to host a kids Burns Night event where you can get them involved with the reading of poetry and maybe using a recorder to pipe in a haggis that they’ve helped to prepare.  They could make a Scottish flag to hang up or could colour in place settings using some of the words in the poems of Burns.  For more inspiration and ideas for a special childrens event visit https://www.activityvillage.co.uk/burns-night

 

 

Posted on

Put a feather in your cap for the Hat Festival!

It’s the annual Bridport Hat Festival on September 1, so if you’re looking for last-minute hat ideas, pop down to Livingstone Textiles for all manner of tempting ribbons, braid, bells and trim, including a fantastic  range of feathers, from colourful indian feathers and these gorgeous ostrich plumes:

 

 

 

 

 

 

Or this opulent steampunk blue-black feather trim

 

 

 

 

 

 

or something rather cute in natural brown!

 

 

 

 

 

 

Let your imagination run wild at Livingstone Textiles

…and remember, if you want to get ahead, get a hat!

 

Posted on

The Bridport Wassail

In the town of Bridport in West Dorset we have a community orchard that was begun in 2009 with the planting of 23 half standard apple trees as part of the Symondsbury Apple Project.  In February 2010 this was added to and there are now 58 fruit trees in total, including some old and rare varieties that have stood the test of time.  All the trees and the green spaces surrounding them are carefully tended by a group of local volunteers.  The Community Orchard is a public space for everyone to enjoy and lies just behind St Marys church off South Street in St Marys Field.  It regularly holds community events that have a traditional theme, often with the imbibing of good local Cider from West Milton Cider Company.  Around the 18th of January each year a custom known as a Wassail has been revived in the orchard which involves much merriment, mulled cider and hot apple juice.

view from Church tower(photo Sheila Hawkins)

Wassailing

twelfthnight

Wassail gets its name from an Old English greeting “waes hael“, meaning “be well”. Said to be a Saxon custom where at the start of each year, the lord of the manor would shout ‘waes hael’ and the assembled crowd would reply ‘drinc hael‘, meaning ‘drink and be healthy’.

A Wassail Bowl is a great thing, a vessel of carved wood or pottery featuring many handles for shared drinking, it is passed around an orchard amidst singing and shouting and was especially popular in the cider producing counties of the Southwest, primarily Cornwall, Devon, Somerset and Dorset.

Wassailing is a traditional ceremony where in the depths of winter, apple tress are sung to and blessed on the eve of twelfth night in anticipation of a heavy yield the following autumn.  It normally takes place at night where a Wassail king or queen will lead a procession around the orchard singing loudly and making much noise.  The king or queen is then lifted into a tree where he or she will hang toast from the wassail bowl that has been soaked in a hot brew of mead, ale, honey and spices of cinnamon, ginger and roasted crab apples from the previous years crop.  The assembled crowd will then shout, yell and bang pans and a shotgun is usually fired into the trees to frighten away evil spirits that would otherwise spoil the crop.  The king or queen will then go to the oldest tree in the orchard which harbours the oldest spirit and pour some of the mead around the base of the tree as an offering of respect.  The fertility of the entire orchard is said to reside in this spirit, known as the Apple Tree Man in Somerset.  It is then customary to sing the wassail song:

Its our Wassail, jolly Wassail, joy come too our jolly Wassail.

How well the May bloom, how well the May bear, so we may have apples and cider next year
Hats full, caps full,
Three bushel bags full, and little heaps under the stairs
Hip Hip……HURRAH!

The Carhampton Wssail, one of the oldest in the country

In Bridport, our own local troupe of morris dancers will be entertaining the crowds at the Bridport Wassail on Sunday the 21st January from 3pm onwards with traditional folk music and morris dancing with sticks and hankies.  Livingstone Textiles are proud to supply Wyld Morris with the bells, ribbons and tatter coat fabrics required for their kit.

 

Wyld Morris are based at Monkton Wyld Court at the sustainable living community to which they contribute towards funding in return for a practice space in their beautiful pine hall on Wednesday evenings.

 

 

Posted on

Folk Festival 2017

Bridport is known for its ambience and hosts some lively community festivals.   We also have a vibrant music scene in the town, one genre of which is Folk Music and a handful of regular folk music performers have decided to showcase some of the best local talent in Dorset by hosting the First Ever Bridport Folk Festival. What’s more, it’s a Free Festival!!

Folk music, song and dance are part of our rich British culture and it is positively thriving among the young and old alike in the town and deep into the hills of Dorset.  To showcase our heritage, The Bridport Folk Festival will be hosting over 76 acts, more than 50 of these acts are musicians that will be singing and playing at several venues across the weekend of the 11th, 12th and 13th of August.  There will be 3 main stages all within the town centre, one in Bucky Doo, one in The Borough Gardens and the main stage will be on the Millenium Green. All stages are free to enter and any money collected will be shared in half with the RNLI.

Livingstone Textiles are very proud to have supported this event with both sponsorship and materials to build the stage sets and providing a venue large enough for a community sewing bee to stitch the vast quanities of extra wide calico needed for the stage roofs.  The calico that has been used is 3 metres wide from selvedge to selvedge so it’s ideal to use as a lightweight cover in the event of showers and as shade from the sun.  The stages will also be featuring backdrops made from our polycotton plains and draped with our two tone organza and we’ll be featuring pictures of these on the blog after the event.

marble

 

Folk Festivals are renowned throught the UK and as well as the numerous song, dance and instrument workshops that take place are always the Morris.

Morris dancing can be traced back at least to the time of Shakepeare in our country and it is widely believed that the Moors people brought it here when they settled in this country, hence Moorish/Morris dancing.  This is just one of many different theories but one things for certain, it’s certainly not just for men.  We have some great female and mixed dance teams in Dorset and they can all be seen dancing enthusiastically throughout the summer at West Bay, Bridport, Charmouth, Lyme Regis, Swanage and at many small villages between from May to September.  Livingstone Textiles holds a vast stock of ribbons and bells, threads and fabrics and are suppliers to Bridport’s very own morris team, Wyld Morris, based at Monkton Wyld, Bridport.  They have recently furnished themselves with colourful tatter jackets made from scraps of fabric that we’ve supplied along with their own odds and ends.  Indeed, Livingstones has it’s very own incognito Morris dancer working in one of the shops!

58ee4d418ded6050a363dc2c_Morris_dancers_0094_600

 

 

 

 

 

 

We regularly see the local Morris dancers in our shop getting ribbons, fabric and other habadashery supplies they need from us so we are all very excited about this event.

For more information on the folk festival please visit their website.